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Talk Exchange

What is wealth? Part I: Amandine Soudeille

Chief Marketing Officer at Alpian
Roman Balzan
Group 7 Article, 2 min read

The question of what true wealth looks like is deep at the heart of i-vest – so to kick off our new series, we started off close to home. Amandine Soudeille is an Investment Analyst at Alpian, lives in Canton Vaud, and is the kind of person who has spent more than her fair share thinking about wealth from every angle.

Amandine began her career in the Finance department of Porsche France in 2015 before working in the FX Sales desk of Société Générale CIB in Geneva and then as a Fixed Income Sales/Trader for Valcourt, a securities broker in Geneva. She holds a Master in Management (PGE) of Toulouse Business School, as well as an MSc in Finance at EBS Universität in Germany. Amandine has a passion for Porsche and loves playing golf.

Thank you so much for taking the time! We look forward to connecting with you about this fascinating topic.

Wealth is in fact achievable. You need to do what you're good at and what you like.

Impulse #1. When we hear “wealth”, most people’s minds immediately go to finances. From your perspective, how important are your finances when it comes to your wealth?

I’d say yes, finance does come into mind when we hear wealth. But more importantly, being wealthy means thinking differently, having the possibility to reason and act in a less cost-efficient way. It actually means we can afford to be someone less rational, sometimes, and would not position the price as your number one argument for not stressing about money for each decision.

Impulse #2. What is your own personal definition of true wealth?

True wealth is abstract, it links a mindset, a psychological state, with reality – the fact that we should not care about money if we don’t need to. It’s having the power to follow your dreams and actually do it.

Impulse #3. What is something that irritates you about the conversation around wealth?

All I’m going to say here is: Wealth is in fact achievable. You need to do what you’re good at and what you like.

Impulse #4. What do you wish every child learned in school about wealth?

Children should be told that people’s ideas have value, that they are worth something.

Students are often taught to follow rules and that if they don’t do what they’re told, they won’t succeed.

I actually think we should be a bit more open and tell them they don’t need to follow an existing path to succeed, that they can draw their own. I would advise them to align their future job with what they like to do because that’s the best way towards success and, yes, wealth. There is not just one way to success, any job can lead to it if you are good at what you’re doing.

Thank you very much, Amandine!

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Disclaimer:
Alpian has submitted an application for a full banking license to Switzerland’s Financial Market Supervisory Authority (FINMA). Content of this publication is for informational purposes only, you should not construe any such information as legal, tax, investment, financial, or other advice.

Group 7 Article, 2 min read
About the author
Roman Balzan
Chief Marketing Officer at Alpian

Roman holds a Master’s degree in economics from the University of St. Gallen HSG. He is an experienced brand- & marketing strategist and defines himself as a “crazy-creative-thinker”. He started his career at the ‘IFJ Institute for Young Entrepreneurs / Venturelab.ch‘ as Senior Project Manager before co-founding Suxedoo.ch. He later joined Google as Programs Lead for the Employer Brand Marketing in EMEA. In 2018 he was recruited by Lime, the US-based scooter giant, supporting the launch of the company’s first European market, Switzerland, after which he led Lime’s EMEA Marketing & Brand efforts before joining Alpian.

Roman loves hiking so much that in 2009 he walked 2300km on the Camino de Santiago with his dog Nelson. He walked all the way from St. Gallen to Santiago de Compostela in Western Spain.